Protesters promise millions of demonstrations on Friday .. The woman in the heart of the demonstration square in Baghdad


BAGHDAD / Obelisk: A security source said on Friday, November 8, 2019, that security forces take strict measures in the center of Baghdad before the Friday prayers.

The source said that the security forces took strict security measures in the center of Baghdad before the Friday prayers, adding that “the security situation is good above the bridges of the Senk and the Republic and at the Turkish restaurant.” 

The source pointed out that “the roads leading to al-Khalani Square and the bridges of the free and martyrs are impassable, with a small number of demonstrators,” stressing “there is no clashes or frictions with the security forces.” 

Sources in Basra province said that the security authorities in the province had established a new concrete barrier near the government compound in Basra in addition to early security cuts in the main streets of Basra.

The sources announced that the city of Basra does not witness security cuts of roads and confined to the roads linking the districts and districts

And start a million demonstration after Friday prayers, in Tahrir Square, the center of demonstrations in Baghdad. 

The contribution of women to the ongoing demonstrations in Iraq appeared the most striking phenomenon in this protest movement that has dominated the streets of the capital and some Iraqi cities in recent days. 

The presence of women in the photos and videos that spread on social media about these demonstrations and their various activities. 

Perhaps this is not a new phenomenon. The contribution of the feminist movement to the political and social movement in Iraq in the last two decades has emerged at pivotal moments, as is the case with mass demonstrations of women in 2003.

Live testimonials 

Rhea – activist

Riya works to deliver equipment, medical supplies and supplies to the protesters and is keen to come daily to Tahrir Square in the heart of Baghdad, where protesters gather. 

I am in Tahrir Square, not as a demonstrator but as a mother. I fear a lot for the young people here and I hope that no more blood is wasted. 

The presence of women in the early days was little, then began to increase. I see women of all generations and from different social strata. I see grandmothers who prepare bread, tourists (bread made with rice flour) and tea sellers along with modern young women. 

I saw the Baghdad woman in the yard of protesting with her folkloric image, which I had not seen for a long time, that the Hatun, who wears the abaya, sheila, and the ‘julab’ in her side, stands calling her Lord wearing a shrewd trap in her hand and chanting, ‘May Allah protect you and keep evil from you.’

I saw mothers of my age who came with their children and I saw young women and girls shouting loudly with all the ambition of the youth and their brutality, which I feel we lost with many things we lost. We were (as a generation) always stumble with many disappointments, but these young women and young people are stronger than us and are still violent and I hope they do not go through what we went through. I have not been able to lock up my tears in many humanitarian situations and the positions of solidarity I have witnessed there. They are many I can not shorten. 

 Raghad – a demonstrator

This is my first demonstration. It is a demonstration that has no political agenda or religious symbols. I did not participate in the demonstration that took place at the beginning of October.

Obelisk – Agencies

http://almasalah.com/ar/news/181814/%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D8%AD%D8%AA%D8%AC%D9%88%D9%86-%D9%8A%D8%B9%D8%AF%D9%88%D9%86-%D8%A8%D8%AA%D8%B8%D8%A7%D9%87%D8%B1%D8%A7%D8%AA-%D9%85%D9%84%D9%8A%D9%88%D9%86%D9%8A%D8%A9-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AC%D9%85%D8%B9%D8%A9-%D9%88%D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D8%B1%D8%A3%D8%A9-%D9%81%D9%8A-%D9%82%D9%84%D8%A8-%D8%B3%D8%A7%D8%AD%D8%A9-%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AA%D8%B8%D8%A7%D9%87%D8%B1-%D8%A8%D8%A8%D8%BA%D8%AF%D8%A7%D8%AF

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